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In the developing world, access to incubators is limited by cost and distance, and millions of premature babies die each year. TED Fellow Jane Chen shows an invention that could keep millions of these infants warm — a design that’s safe, portable, low-cost and life-saving.

MIT engineer Amy Smith designs ingenious low-cost devices to tackle tough problems in developing countries. She received a MacArthur “Genius” Grant in 2004, and was the first woman to win MIT’s famed Lemelson Prize. In this talk, she explains the vision behind her inventions, which include eco-friendly charcoal and a laboratory incubator that doesn’t require electricity. (Recorded February 2006 in Monterey, CA. Duration: 15:48)

At age 14, in poverty and famine, a Malawian boy built a windmill to power his family’s home. Now at 22, William Kamkwamba, who speaks at TED, here, for the second time, shares in his own words the moving tale of invention that changed his life.

It’s preposterous to think that you could incubate a social venture you were developing while living in an African village, receiving mentorship, training, funding, and working with the local community to get your venture off the ground. But in fact, that’s exactly what you could do as a Global Development Intern with Think Impact.

Saul Garlick, Think Impact’s Founder & Executive Director. speaks and explains the incredible opportunity of Think Impact’s Global Development Internship, an 8-week village homestay and social venture incubation program for top social entrepreneurs. Applications for the Global Development Internship close on February 28, 2010 for this summer. So watch this inspiring video interview with Saul and fill out an application form ASAP!

Interviewing the Founder of Think Impact: Incubating Social Ventures in African Villages from Teju Ravilochan on Vimeo.

iHub acting as a catalyst for software geeks to grow their own businesses

MPES mobile banking DEMO

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